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The report said MEK has an extensive support network in both Europe and the United States. A year after the United States claimed to have disarmed MEK in Iraq, the group was operational in Los Angeles, Washington, Paris, and Colonge, Germany.

Is 10 years enough time for a historically violent group to change its ways and persuade the State Department to remove its name from their list of foreign terrorist organizations? Supporters of MEK say the group ended terrorist attacks in 2001, but documents revealed by U.S government and news reports suggest the group was still active in planning attacks as recently as 2010.
MEK, founded in the 1960s, blended elements of Islamism and Stalinism and participated in the overthrow of the US-backed Shah of Iran in 1979. Ahead of the revolution, the MKO conducted attacks and assassinations against both Iranian and Western targets.
The terrorist group joined Saddam's army during the Iraqi imposed war on Iran (1980-1988) and helped Saddam and killed thousands of Iranian civilians and soldiers during the US-backed Iraqi imposed war on Iran.
The New York Times reported that MEK was added to the list in 1997 "as a goodwill gesture toward Iran's newly elected reform-minded president, Mohammad Khatami."
Supporters argue that MEK gave up arms in 2001, but in April of 2001 the State Department said Iraq was still actively supporting MEK operations against Iran and at a press briefing last October, then current assistant secretary of state for public affairs P.J. Crowley said he didn't know of any plans to remove MEK from the list.
The State Department "looks not only at the actual terrorist attacks that a group has carried out, but also at whether the group has engaged in planning and preparations for possible future acts of terrorism or retains the capability and intent to carry out such acts," a statement on its Web site says.
And in 2004 MEK was still actively involved in planning and executing attacks according to FBI investigation documents released in May under the Freedom of Information Act. A joint investigation between Los Angeles-based agents and German police recorded phone calls where MEK members discussed operations.
The report tells of a scheme by MEK where the group used children with multiple identities to collect social benefits in Germany, then used the money to purchase large quantities of night vision goggles and GPS systems to improve accuracy of mortar attacks in Tehran.
The report said MEK has an extensive support network in both Europe and the United States. A year after the United States claimed to have disarmed MEK in Iraq the group was operational in Los Angeles, Washington, Paris, and Colonge, Germany.
The FBI report says the group's political wing often uses demonstrations to gain support from government officials and members of Congress "under the pretext of human rights issues in Iran."
Just last June, Iran arrested members of MEK who were planning a bombing on the anniversary of Iran's elections.

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